Dying to get a bike when I move to STL, and this road style by PUBLIC seems right for my needs—fast for fitness yet chill enough for daily commutes. What do my cycling readers think? Any recommendations for brands, style, gear? 

Dying to get a bike when I move to STL, and this road style by PUBLIC seems right for my needs—fast for fitness yet chill enough for daily commutes. What do my cycling readers think? Any recommendations for brands, style, gear? 

Anonymous said: Cary... any videos you can recommend that give instructions on good running form? Back in the day my trainer gave me pointers, but after a long hiatus I forget much of what he taught me-- and I'm not in the financial position right now to go back to a trainer.

There is no “right” way to run, but in general, you want to keep your body straight up and down, with feet striking directly under the hips held directly under the shoulders. Relax your shoulders and neck—this place gets enough tension anyway, and there’s no need to waste energy on nervous muscles. Think chill. When your shoulders start to creep up and tighten,  consciously roll them back and roll your head around to loosen those muscles. Keep the arms close to the body and the hands in loose fists; again, the key here is to relax. The only thing working hard should be your legs!

For more info on running technique, check out this video by VO2Max Productions.

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Anonymous said: Follow up to my first question on recommendations for running in the winter. How do you hydrate on those cold nights? I live in the city but I have a feeling that the fountains will be off/frozen and that my hydrobelt will freeze relatively quickly. Any suggestions??

I hydrate in winter just like any other time, although it is harder at this time to judge when I’m really thirsty. Most fountains in NYC’s parks are shut off so you def want to bring fluids with you, and thankfully, your fuel belt will NOT freeze! What with the constant movement and closeness to your body, the water will stay water—and refreshingly cold—so get excited… No excuses not to run!

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Anonymous said: I'm going to be training for my second marathon (first attempt at a spring marathon) this winter. Any tips you could recommend to help me survive the New England weather?

Invest in lots of layers! Target and Old Navy have great options for thermal jackets and tights (think cheap because you’ll want a lot of stuff), and a legit pair of running gloves—sold at places like New Balance or North Face—will do wonders. Also, don’t forget to hydrate on your long runs. In the winter, we tend to feel less sweaty during outdoor workouts, but that doesn’t mean you’re not losing water and electrolytes, so if you don’t already have a fuel belt, now is the time. Lastly, try to enjoy the cold! Running in sub-freezing temps can be a bitch, but it can also feel exhilarating, especially when we spend so much time cooped up inside. Consider each run your opportunity to shake out the cabin fever, soak up vitamin D, and otherwise be a wild child till it’s time to go back in and hibernate. Best of luck with training!

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Have you joined CLASSPASS yet?

Well, you should. It has changed my workout routine. $99 a month for up to ten classes at studios around the New York area—literally hundreds of studios and thousands of classes to choose from. Or commit for a full year, and get unlimited classes each month. I can’t speak highly enough of the customer service or the scheduling platform, and the cancellation process is easy-breezy (should you decide to be lazy). Seriously. Join CLASSPASS now. Before Mother Nature brings us another Winter From Hell and it’s too cold to run outside and you resort to doing Zumba routines on the subway because there’s no other alternative.

Last month, I decided with the support of my parents and boyfriend to pick up stakes and move back home to Missouri. As many of you FrED readers know, depression—in varying stages of severity—has long been a battle of mine, and it dawned on me just this summer, after six years on the East Coast, that hope and help will only come with closeness to my mom and dad. I need them and love them and miss them too much to be so far away. I will leave Ralph Lauren next month in good stead and knowing that I always have a future with the company should I wish to try again, and I leave with nothing but love for this wild city and my family here. This decision is an exciting one (I get to buy a car! attend Mizzou football games!) and a scary one (What if I hate it?). But when I think of the possibilities—of seeing my parents long and often, of getting closer to my baby sister who now calls Kansas City home—I can’t help but feel a thrill. We may never escape our inner torments or our fates; we pack them up with the clothes and dishes and carry them with us wherever we go, and this will not be my last dip in the deep end of melancholia. Better, I realize now, to suffer close to the ones who love me most and best, than suffer far from them, even in the greatest city on earth.

Last month, I decided with the support of my parents and boyfriend to pick up stakes and move back home to Missouri. As many of you FrED readers know, depression—in varying stages of severity—has long been a battle of mine, and it dawned on me just this summer, after six years on the East Coast, that hope and help will only come with closeness to my mom and dad. I need them and love them and miss them too much to be so far away. I will leave Ralph Lauren next month in good stead and knowing that I always have a future with the company should I wish to try again, and I leave with nothing but love for this wild city and my family here. This decision is an exciting one (I get to buy a car! attend Mizzou football games!) and a scary one (What if I hate it?). But when I think of the possibilities—of seeing my parents long and often, of getting closer to my baby sister who now calls Kansas City home—I can’t help but feel a thrill. 

We may never escape our inner torments or our fates; we pack them up with the clothes and dishes and carry them with us wherever we go, and this will not be my last dip in the deep end of melancholia. Better, I realize now, to suffer close to the ones who love me most and best, than suffer far from them, even in the greatest city on earth.

Home.

My coworkers are calling Ralph Lauren’s Spring 2015 delivery “the Cary Collection” because every look reminded them of me :)Needless to say, I am over the moon about the whole shebang…and very, very happy that I never tossed my cargo pants from 2005.

My coworkers are calling Ralph Lauren’s Spring 2015 delivery “the Cary Collection” because every look reminded them of me :)

Needless to say, I am over the moon about the whole shebang…and very, very happy that I never tossed my cargo pants from 2005.

On a more somber note, today we are all thinking of the events that took place thirteen years ago, of their impact on our lives, and of the lives that were lost. The above picture has long had a hold on me—I can see my own father—every father—in Robert Peraza, who was pausing at his son’s name inscribed on the WTC memorial wall at the tenth anniversary ceremony on September 11, 2011. The anguish he must still feel is unimaginable but universal. That thirteen years later the impact of that day on our collective conscience is still so strong speaks volumes of the strength of our American spirit. 

On a more somber note, today we are all thinking of the events that took place thirteen years ago, of their impact on our lives, and of the lives that were lost.

The above picture has long had a hold on me—I can see my own father—every father—in Robert Peraza, who was pausing at his son’s name inscribed on the WTC memorial wall at the tenth anniversary ceremony on September 11, 2011. The anguish he must still feel is unimaginable but universal.

That thirteen years later the impact of that day on our collective conscience is still so strong speaks volumes of the strength of our American spirit. 

"I’m not really a big drinker, more of a bar food person actually—such a sucker for jalapeño poppers. The Levee in Williamsburg—they have great food. It’s so gross—things like cheesy fries—and it’s stupid bad for you, but I eat it anyway. I might bring along a flask filled with Fireball. People say that’s a frat boy thing, but how was I supposed to know?"

Taylor LaShae, speaking to Into the Gloss
(I have no idea who this lady is, but after reading the above, she’s my new favorite star.)

The Making of POLO Ralph Lauren for Women’s 4-D Fashion Show, presented in Central Park on September 8-10, 2014. 

"Act your age, mama, not your shoe size."

Prince

It’s SHOESDAY, and I’m just going to die if I don’t get my toes in these styles this season. From the top, the suede Bletisa sandal, the suede Silvana sneaker, and the leopard Blithe sandal, all by Ralph Lauren.

(PS, have you watched the video of Polo’s 4-D fashion show, which took place this week in Central Park? I saw it last night with the rest of our team, and it was just…spectacular. The music, the misty light, the cheer of the crowd, the way Ralph dances on the water, all of it. I cried a little! Fashion!)

Fresh reads, every day.

Anonymous said: Do you really work 10-6 at RL? I also work in fashion, but our office is more like 8:00-6:30, and even that isn't considered enough. My boss also left for maternity leave so I am literally working two jobs for the price of one, and I know I am drastically underpaid to begin with. How can I work this in my favor, either at my current company, or somewhere else if a promotion isn't presented in the nearish future? I feel like I'm drowning here and I have nothing to show for it.

I do work ten to six, but I also eat lunch at my desk every day and spend a lot of downtime meeting with writers, researching story ideas, and otherwise “working” when not working. If you feel like you’re being poorly compensated for your work, making a list of everything you do at your job, some of your recent achievements, your goals for the future, and a few clear ideas of what you could accomplish with more money and/or an assistant. Go to your boss (when she’s in a great mood), and lay it out. Be gracious. Try not to complain too much about what you’re not getting (money, respect, free time, a life), and focus on how much more you could do for your company if they give you more opportunity to succeed.

Example: Right now, I’m covering my own position and that of the PR coordinator. I understand that we may not be in a position to hire a full-time replacement for the PR role, but a part-time or freelance assistant could help the whole department.

Example: I’ve been covering two positions full-time for the past six months and despite the overload have still managed to improve our numbers over last fiscal year. At this rate, we’re on track to double those numbers in FY15. With this in mind, would you be open to talk about a raise in compensation? 

If you love what you’re doing and can’t imagine leaving, consider picking up some freelance work on the weekends. Write, style shoots, consult on marketing projects. Or do something totally unrelated. Get a front desk job at the gym so you never have to pay for Equinox again. Babysit. 

Still feel as though you’re drowning? Time to update the résumé.

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